Irene’s Bar: Moving up the Block

Nobody ever visits Houjie without making a pit stop at Irene’s bar. For over six years, one of Houjie’s hotspots was located behind the Hyatt hotel on the upper west

Ray’s Bar and Restaurant: A Pure Ray of Light

A short walk from the Liaoxia metro station, tucked away behind the Sheraton hotel is one of Houjie’s best hidden treasures. Ray’s Bar and Restaurant oozes hospitality as you enter,

What’s Eating China: Exploring the Middle Kingdom’s Eight Main Cuisines

When I first came to China over four years ago, I obliviously thought all Chinese food was the same. Growing up in the U.K., I was given a false presumption

Locomotive Theme Restaurant: On the Orient Express

The northern town of Shilong recently became the last stop at the far end of Dongguan’s metro line and is also an interim station between Shenzhen and Guangzhou. If you

What’s Eating China: Shangdong Cuisine

Shandong cuisine—as it is known today—was created during the Yuan Dynasty. Over time, it gradually spread to other areas in northeast China: Beijing, Tianjin and even the Emperor’s palace, where

What’s Eating China: Sichuan Cuisine

Colloquially known as the “heavenly country,” due to its abundance of food and natural resources. Most Sichuan dishes are very spicy, although a typical meal includes some more mild options

What’s Eating China: Anhui Cuisine

Anhui cuisine (安徽菜; ānhuī cài) is derived from the native cooking styles of the Huangshan Mountain people and is similar to Jiangsu cuisine. Thanks to ample uncultivated fields and forests

What’s Eating China: Zhejiang Cuisine

Zhejiang cuisine (浙菜; Zhècài) originates from the traditional ways of cooking from around the south of Shanghai to the former Chinese capital of Hangzhou. In general, Zhejiang food is not

What’s Eating China: Jiangsu Cuisine

In general, Jiangsu cuisine’s texture is characterized as soft, but not to the point of being mushy. For example, meat may feel quite delicate, but would not fall from the

WHAT’S EATING CHINA: Hunan CUISINE

Chairman Mao Zedong’s home province of Hunan is renowned throughout China for its fiery flavors. Also called “Xiang” cuisine, it consists of cooking styles from the Xiang River region (near