A Walk on the Wild Side: For Star-Crossed Lovers

Changping is the first town in the country that combines three railway stations and does so rather flawlessly. The latest station—Changping East—opened last year in March and connects Dongguan and

A Walk on the Wild Side: For Devout Buddhists

Though Hong Kong has a big Buddha, Dongguan’s Guanyin statue certainly gives it a run for its money. Claimed to be the world’s largest granite Guanyin (Buddhist goddess), it was

A Walk on the Wild Side: For Adventurous Families

Located at the southern border of Dongguan and Shenzhen is the well-appointed Mission Hills Golf Club in Tangxia, which also includes a handful of apartments, hotels, restaurants and a small

A Walk on the Wild Side: For Beach Lovers

Located just beside the Tongsha Reservoir, Foling Lake is like a small toddler chasing a big, tropical jungle brother. Similar to its sibling, a 5-km-long, lychee-lined bike trail wraps around

A Walk on the Wild Side: For Bold Cyclists

The southeast outskirts of the city hide impressive patches of vegetation and lakes. Among them is the Tongsha Reservoir found at the corner of Ring and Guanchang Roads. Favored by

A Walk on the Wild Side: For Amateur Historians

With crisscrossing rivers and streams, Dongguan is far from lacking water-front parks. In fact, a short trip from Dongcheng will find you at the edge of the Pearl River Delta.

A Walk on the Wild Side – Highlighting Dongguan’s Most Unique Parks

Concealed by bustling shopping malls and grinding factories is a panoply of nature. Here, residents find solace from the noise of the city streets. Friends take a walk, families picnic

A Bit of Grapes & Hops for September

Romisa Chilean Chardonnay (Central Valley, 2016) Romisa Chilean Chardonnay is an exemplar of its kind. It exudes buttery glycerin goodness. Reliable sunshine. An escape from the daily routine. It’s clean—but

Explaining First-Tiers, again

An incredible amount of fuss has been made about Dongguan becoming a first-tier city. The question is, why? One writer seems to have figured out the secret. It seems fitting

Diaosi (Losers)

The dregs of Chinese society, igored by their government, scoffed at by their countrymen were angry, hopeless and weak. the Internet gave them a nasty voice. How can we describe